In the United States


State and local governments in the United States using Instant Runoff Voting (ranked choice voting)

  • Alabama (adopted in federal court agreeent for use by overseas voter in congressional election runoff in 2013; uncertain about future use)
  • Arkansas (adopted by the legislature 2005 and expanded by legislature in 2007; first used in 2006; only for overseas voters in runoffs)
  • Basalt, Colorado (adopted as charter amendment by voters in 2002, to be used in mayoral elections with more than two candidates)
  • Berkeley, California (adopted as charter amendment by voters in 2004; first used in 2010; for mayor, city council and other city offices)
  • Hendersonville, North Carolina (used in 2007 2009  and 2011 after council adopted statute to participate in pilot; for mayor and multi-seat variation for city council; to be considered election by election)
  • Louisiana (adopted by legislature and first used 1990s; only for overseas and military voters in federal and state runoffs)
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota (adopted as charter amendment by voters in  2006; first used in 2009 for mayor and city council)
  • Oakland, California (adopted as charter amendment by voters in 2006 ballot measure, first used in 2010; for mayor, city council and other city offices)
  • Portland, Maine (adopted as charter amendment by voters in 2010; first used in 2011 for electing mayor)
  • San Francisco, California (adopted as charter amendment by voters in 2002, first used in 2004; for mayor, Board of Supervisors and other city offices)
  • San Leandro, California (adopted as charter amendment as option by voters in 2000; first used in 2010; for mayor and city council)
  • South Carolina (adopted by legislature and first used in 2006; only for overseas voters in federal and state runoffs)
  • Springfield, Illinois (adopted by voters in 2007; first used in 2011 for overseas voters)
  • St. Paul, Minnesota (adopted as charter amendment by voters in 2009, first used in November 2011; for mayor  and city council)
  • Takoma Park, Maryland (adopted as charter amendment by city council in 2006 after voters approved 2005 advisory referendum, first used in 2007; for mayor and city council)
  • Telluride, Colorado (adopted as statute by voters in 2008; first used for mayoral elections in 2011 

Expected implementations (as of October 2013) 

  • Memphis, Tennessee (adopted 2008; scheduled for 2015 or electing city council and other offices)
  • Santa Fe, New Mexico (adopted for mayor and city council with contingencies, 2008

Optional or Contingent Adoptions in the United States

  • Ferndale, Michigan (adopted for mayor and city council with contingencies, 2004)
  • Santa Clara County, California (adopted by voters as option in charter in 1998)
  • Sarasota, Florida (adopted for mayor and city council with contingencies, 2007)
  • Vancouver, Washington (adopted for city elections with contingencies, 1999)

*Ann Arbor (MI), Aspen (CO), Burlington (VT), Cary (NC), New York (NY), Pierce County (WA) and Yonkers (NY) and the state of North Carolina have used IRV in the past elections in the United States

**Cambridge (MA) uses the multi-winner version of ranked choice voting system for its city council and school committee elections It is the choice voting method of proportional voting where each of the nine winners needs a little more than 10% of the vote to win one of nine city council seats and just over 14% to tin one of six school committee seats. Davis (CA) passed an advisory measure in 2006 in favor of this system.